The Wonders of WordPress

Out of every innovation and advancement made in the 21th century, the one thing that underlines the modern world is globalization. We as humans are more connected than ever before, which in turn rises the need for individualism and self-expression. This is what explains why social media and broadcasting platforms are heavily used. So it’s no wonder Word Press is such a well-respected CMS (Content Management System). Word Press is used to create and manage any digital content that created with it. Because there’s so much you can do with Word Press, it’s could be used for business websites, blogs, portfolios, authors, journalists, and much more. So in this post, we’ll discuss what makes Word Press one of the more efficient CMS you can ever find.

Actions Speak Louder than Words

Photo by Webaroo on Unsplash

Instead of finding ways to revere the greatness of Word Press, I find it more effective to just explain in detail what Word Press is capable of. As a CMS, Word Press allows virtually anyone to create a website without having masterly programming skills to create one. You can acquire the simplified version with WordPress.com or the full version on WordPress.org, but they’re fully functionally and easy-to-use. Word Press guides the user through building their site, providing countless themes and plugins to give them the website they desire. Additionally, it doesn’t take much to manage, especially with the feature that allows multiple users access to the website’s management system.

Photo by Webaroo on Unsplash


Now without knowing about other CMS, it’s difficult to see how Word Press could be so worthy of praise. But unlike other CMS such as Joomla and Drupal, Word Press can be accessed by anyone anywhere, no matter the skill or device used. This makes it very user-friendly. Because of the many available features, it can be used for a wide range of topics. It also has a huge community of users you can find from around the world to connect with. Where else can you find a free system that caters so much to an everyday user?


Overall, Word Press truly is the place to be. A place where someone could present themselves to the world for free shouldn’t be taken for granted. I wouldn’t doubt a service that’s highly recommended by so many people, but don’t take my word for it. For more information on WordPress and how it fairs against competition, check out these websites for each topic respectively. Enjoy!

Designing Web Banners

When browsing the Internet, there’s many things that a user would come across: articles, videos, video games, broadcasting sites, social media, and much more. For companies that depend on advertising for the expansion of their brand (which is virtually all businesses), the Internet is a gold mine of opportunities to promote themselves to the world. But to do that, they need advertisements. And that’s where web banners come in! Across the Internet, thousands of digital ads are found on countless websites. So in this blog, we’ll be discussing the theory and process of these common-and sometimes annoying-elements.

Who Designs Them

Photo by Dylan Gillis on Unsplash

Web banners are digital advertisements that are embedded into web pages of their choice. Though it sounds simple, there’s intricate work involved in making and presenting such banner ads. So, whose responsible for creating them? That is none other than marketing designers, of course! Marketing designers work with companies to brainstorm and design resources that can advertised via print or digital. Additionally, Marketing Designers ear an annual salary of $69,42, which can increase over time as they continue to build on their experience and skill.

The Process

Photo by Startup Stock Photos from Pexels

There are many things to consider when creating a web banner for a company. The first step is considering what would be the best size for the banner ads. There’s statistical evidence on the most effective banner sizes. The most effective banner sizes are listed below:

  • Medium Rectangle 300 x 250
  • Leaderboard 728 x 90
  • Wide Skyscraper 160 x 600
  • Banner 468 x 60
  • Skyscraper 120 x 600
  • Rectangle 300 x 100
  • Half-Page 300 x 600
  • Large Rectangle 336 x 280
  • Mobile Leaderboard 320 x 50
  • Billboard 970 x 250
Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

And when you chose the best size for your banner ad, you need to decide the best placement for it on a website. Of course, options would be limited when you’re paying for a place on someone else’s web page. But it’s best to look for places that closest to the web page’s main content. Something else to consider would be the design of the banner ad. Can it fit in with the web page and still stand out? Many marketing designers focus on design elements that can grab a user’s attention while making the advertisement simple and easy to read. Since people don’t click on websites expecting to look at ads, banner ads must be able to attract the user and get straight to the point for what their brand is. This is where seamless animations, contrasting colors, and compelling headlines with CTAs really come into handy. With all these elements carefully constructed, the banner ads can successfully bring web users to their landing pages.


Overall, Marketing designers have a lot of work cut out for them, especially in times where technology continues to evolve each year. Personally, I believe could do this job and enjoy the work I’d do. I don’t mind tedious work and the creative challenges that comes with each project would keep me engaged in my work. This job could also help build professional social skill from working alongside companies. But enough of this tangent, hopefully this blog helped understand the process of creating banner ads. It took a lot of research to put this together, so for more information on design tips for banner ads check out 99designs and Match2One. Enjoy!

Typography in Web Design

In my earlier post, I showed how web designers use the Joshua Tree Epiphany to tie their website together in a way that’s visually pleasing. No matter how innovative an idea may be, without the proper structure it can look disorganized and unattractive. And this concept also applies to typography, the art of arranging words to evoke emotion and give a message. As a reader, we don’t automatically acknowledge the process of finding the best typefaces and fonts for the website we click on. But typography is an essential technique for designing web designs. So, in this blog, we’ll cover the usage of typefaces: both good and bad.

How are Fonts Used

Photo by Jon Tyson on Unsplash

Before we look at examples of typography in websites, it’s best to understand how fonts are used to convey messages and emotions. Although it may not be comprehended at first glance, the style of a font must be taken into consideration when presenting text to an audience. When publishing magazines or newspapers, the body text is most likely going to be a serif typeface because the ‘serifs’ or extra strokes at the ends of the letter helps with readability. On the other hand, most websites use sans-serif typefaces because it works well with any monitor no matter the screen resolution. And if you want regal invitations, decorative or calligraphy typefaces are the best choice. Furthermore, the font style, size, weight, and more must also be considered. Certain fonts can give your work a sophisticated, modern, or abstract feel. There are fonts that are partially art and fonts that contribute to word play. The possibilities of typefaces and fonts are endless, and with this knowledge let’s see how to use typography well and not so well.

Critiqued Typography Techniques

Up first is a website called Mr. Bottles, an antique bottle collecting resource. The first that’s noticed is the main title and header of the website. And if the font is almost unreadable (as presented), then it will confuse the user. I, in fact, didn’t know what it said until I looked at its URL. It’s good to have a font that matches the theme of the website, but it becomes a waste if it can’t be comprehended. Another critique would be the usage of the same font in the menu. It’s always best to make the font used the menu different than the watermark; something more legible and easier to spot. It ensures that the wordmark logo doesn’t compete with everything else on the website for the user’s attention

Besides the technical aspect of typography, a font has the match the theme of the website. And Penny Juice gives a good example of this in its wordmark. For a website based on children, it does give the child-friendly feel like other child-centered websites. Even though a child wouldn’t click on this website, parents and people who work with kids respond well to websites that look child-friendly. Using vivid or pastel colors with typefaces that are more rounded and cuter can go a long way.

Applauded Typography Techniques

To end on a good note, let’s look at websites that uses typography well. And to start off, we have The Next Rembrandt, a promotion website for said film. In contrast to Mr. Bottles, this website makes the wordmark the center of attention. And simultaneously making sure the menu and header are equally important and therefore legible. The wordmark’s choice of font gives off a mysterious feel that matches the theme of the website and even the film. It definitely shows that a wordmark can be abstract and comprehensible!

Next is this simple and symmetrical website. It really shows that a less can be more. Though the text isn’t anything special like the past websites shown, Mixd, a website designing company, uses typography is other ways. For a website that boasts about “beautiful form” and “perfect function”, it does show it in their word tracking and leading. The way they space out the pieces of text along with the letters themselves reflects the perfection they’re trying to promote.

Using the Joshua Tree Epiphany in Websites

The Joshua Tree Epiphany can easily be seen as the blueprint of basic design. It consists of Contrast, Repetition, Alignment, and Proximity. You can’t have the most unique and flashiest idea, but without these principles, there will always be something…off. It’s always refreshing to see simple designs that flow so well together because of the usage of the Joshua Tree Epiphany. So, in this blog will be highlighting the usage of the Epiphany in web design. And our example will be Lemonade, a Home and Rental Insurance company.

Contrast

To put it simply, if elements aren’t the same, make them stand out. Contrasting items in your design draws attention, which is essential for anything that you want your audience to pay attention. Lemonade uses this principle very well in the way they sparsely use pink in their mainly grey and white landing page. This color pop keeps the audience hooked and makes it easy to find certain links or CTAs.

Repetition

Now if you’re going to make designs specified to grab one’s attention, make sure to repeat them. Consistent elements in a design keeps everything unified and recognizable to any user, no matter how many times they’ve visited the website. In this website’s case, the pink color was used throughout their FAQ. And it wasn’t used randomly, but for hyperlinks to other pages in their website. Which is an ingenious idea, even if it’s a simple.

Alignment

Next is something simple, but equally important. Placing things on the website randomly only brings confusion. Giving the elements in the website some sort of a visual tie keeps things clear and readable. Lemonade shows a good example in their blog page. Center aligning the title and graphics, left-aligning the text, and keeping social media links to the right.

Proximity

And lastly, there’s proximity which is grouping related items together to make visual units. It removes clutter and gives clear structure to your design. Organized designs are more likely to be read and remembered. You can see this in the way the introduction for ‘Making a Change” is close to the title and spaced out from the next piece of text. Using space instead for clear transition instead of graphic designs is much more efficient in easy readability.

As you can see, the Joshua Tree Epiphany is essential for a well-rounded website. Hopefully this quick explanation is enough to quickly use it to practice. Unfortunately, all this information comes straight from my personal notes, but feel free to look for websites like Lemonade that use these principles for a good reference. Enjoy!

What Makes a Good Landing Page?

In an earlier blog, I covered good strategies for designing a website. Considering things like your target audience, color psychology, and functionality, are good examples of such strategies for your website overall. But what about a website’s first impression? In this case, the first thing an audience would see can either be the website’s homepage, or its landing page. Since every website has a homepage, we’re focusing on something less common to land on. While a landing page might seem unnecessary for your web page, it’s at least good to know the do’s and don’ts of a landing page if it’s ever needed.

Designing the Perfect Landing Page

Photo by Le Buzz on Unsplash

For starters, a good landing page must be straight to the point on its purpose with very little else to distract the audience. Keeping things simple and welcoming is essential for attracting any audience that lands on the page. It’s also important for the landing page to answer any question that would come to mind when reaching the main focus of the landing page. These would include features, any costs, and comparison to any of your competition. Make your landing page flow and engage the audience enough to follow through whatever you want them to do. And finally, you want to make sure that your ‘Call to Action’ is straightforward; if you redirect your users too often, they’ll leave in frustration. And if you want to avoid frustrating your users, let’s move on to mistake that should be avoided when making a landing page.

The Don’ts of a Landing Page

Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

Surprisingly, a major blunder with landing pages is that its loading time is too slow. With this being the first thing they see after clicking on the website, landing pages that take more than 5 seconds to appear gets rejected before their even given a chance. This is a problem that revolves around coding the landing page so that it can exceed the insanely low patience and high expectations of the web user. Another mistake to avoid is having a weak headline. A decent balance between direct and creative is ideal, but it’s safer to play direct if you can’t brainstorm attractive headlines. As long as you replace these possible slip-ups with the suggestions above, you’re go to go!


I hope this information helped gather a well enough idea for a landing page, or the consideration of making one. Of course, even without these tips there’s nothing wrong with looking up landing pages for reference. For more information on making good and bad landing pages, check out these websites for each, respectively. And as always, enjoy!

The Rave on Bootstrap CSS

Technology has really expanded its inclusiveness due to the abundant access that the general population can retrieve. This is because now not only do we have everything, but we can learn how to do everything. Remember when people who knew how to make print designs or design websites were seen as super geniuses (or just nerds)? Now with a few lessons and programs with free-to-use graphics, anyone could be a graphic designer! This is where websites like Canva and Bootstrap CSS step in. For now, we’re going to target Bootstrap CSS to figure out why this powerful website is so highly praised.

What is Bootstrap CSS?

Photo by Caspar Camille Rubin on Unsplash

Bootstrap CSS was released in August 2011 as a free-to-use mobile-first framework for developing websites, including templates and JavaScript plugins. Some of the HTML and CSS design template they provide are for typography, navigation, tables, and much more. It’s quick and easy development process allows developers to create responsive web designs. In other words, your website will be able to automatically adjust themselves to work on all devices. As mentioned before, you don’t have to be a whiz at programming to build a website because anyone with basic knowledge of HTML and CSS and use Bootstrap. And because Bootstrap is compatible with all modern browsers like Chrome, Firefox, Safari and Edge, it can be used by virtually anyone with a PC. It’s no wonder that there’s so much hype about such an product.

Bootstraps Popularity

Photo by Karl Pawlowicz on Unsplash

Bootstrap quickly gained popularity as a reliable front-end framework for building websites and web applications. Such a reputation can be shown in the fact that it have a market share with more than 16% of all websites. In January 2020, there were over 1.74 billion websites on the internet. This makes Bootstrap accountable for over 278 million websites (if I did my math correctly). With this much websites found globally, what makes this design framework so infamous? It’s simply because of how effective and easy it is to use. Frameworks such as Bootstrap can add consistency to your projects without having to constantly recode since it comes with pre-built options. This is what allows developers to build beautiful, user-friendly web designs. So it goes without saying, if you wish to create great responsive websites, use Bootstrap


It’s honestly thrilling when you think about how far technology has come from here. Hopefully this information (and recommendation) helps you out with any future web designing projects. For more information check out these websites about Bootstrap CSS and its features here. Enjoy!

Design Strategies for Websites

In my last post, I covered the methods for finding the perfect target audience for your website. But now that you’ve found them, you must move on to step two. This is reeling in the audience to attract regular visitors and promote whatever your website is about. Of course, when one thinks of strategies for designing attractive websites, it’s mainly about the aesthetics. And while it’s very true, it’s also important to make sure the website is consistent and user-friendly. There’s many other strategies for designing a website, but for now we’ll just cover the basic tactics of web design.

Designing Eye Candy

Photo by Hal Gatewood on Unsplash

Making your website visually pleasing for your audience initially stems from any ‘needs’ they may have. From the same example before, if the website’s target audience is elderly people, you should consider larger and easy-to-read fonts. Once all the ‘needs’ are figured out, you can move on the the ‘wants’. And what you should want is a balance of color and typography that accurately represents the topic of your website. Choose color palettes that aren’t too contrasted, but hues from the same color family to bring harmony. Use the principles of typography to pick a few fonts that match the feelings you want to convey (e.g. For sophistication you’d use script, cursive fonts).Finally, when adding info graphics or photos, use the rule of thirds to properly balance the placement of graphics throughout your website.

Use Familiar Conventions

A great part of designing everything is that you have the liberty to do whatever you want. This truth isn’t limited to the layout of a website, but it should be. It’s well and justified to want to design a website that’s unique and full of innovative graphics. However, it’s more ideal to create a website with conventions that the general audience can recognize. This would include placing the web logo at the top above the navigation menu. Or having the contact info at the bottom of the site shown with identifiable icons. This is allows visitors to browse a new website and automatically understand where to go. And that’s much better than them leaving the website in a flash because everything was too “abstract” to navigate through. Sometimes, comfort-zones are the way to go.


Putting aside the hard, dedicated work it takes to develop a website, it takes a lot of brainstorming for designing a website. And that’s because you have to make creativity compromises for yourself and your audience. Something that looks amazing to you, may not be so appealing to your target audience. So, I hope these strategies help give you a create a standard plan for designing your website. There’s much more designing tips out there which can be found in this website about effective website design. Enjoy!

Target Audiences for Web Pages

Has there even been a time where you were searching for specific information, and you get to a website that’s simply…unappealing? It has the information you’re looking for, even extra sources to use for reference. But maybe the level of vocabulary used is too advanced or vague to comprehend. Maybe the layout of information is hard to read or the graphics and colors displayed are unattractive to look at. At times like this where we have abundant access to information, it makes sense to dismiss the website in search for something “better”. But who can say that your definition of better matches the concept that the web designer had in mind. It could be, that instead of bad web design, the website was put together with a certain type of audience in mind. And that is how we will go into properly determining target audiences for web pages.

Start With the Web Page’s Purpose

Photo by Christina Morillo from Pexels

Before searching for the best target audience, you must ask yourself what the web page would be for, and who would need it? Who would be interesting in the topic of your website? Was are you offering that they might need? You can’t expect professional business workers at a site that gives instructions for 5-ingredient meals. And even if they find interest in it, it’s not wise to format such a web page for professionals only. If you feel that your web page will mainly attract amateur chefs or college students, then narrow down your target audience from there. Once you know what your web page will be about and you get a basic idea of who’d be interested, then it’ll be easier to build up a definite target audience.

Look Up the Demographics

Photo by Jopwell from Pexels

Now that you have a general idea of the audience you’ll likely receive, it’s time to research the demographics of the audience. Finding data on the demographics will better help you determine how to set up and design your web page. If your target audience is retired people, ages will range from their late 50s to early 60s. This data alone can already make you settle on a text in big and easy-to-read fonts, with colors that are easy on the eyes. But of course, don’t just stop at age ranges. Web designing professionals look into gender, location, hobbies, lifestyles, and current trends they may share. Of course, some of that information is closer to psychographics, but the more info the easier!


As simple as it sounds, it takes a lot of research and web page testing to ensure that the web page is ready for the public. It may take weeks, months, years, (an eternity), before you feel like you’ve matched your web page with your target audience. But even if it’s easier said than done, it can still be done. I hope this information (and unnecessary words of encouragement) can assist on finding and locking on your target audience. For more information, feel free to check out this website on identifying your target audience. Enjoy!

Spot Colors

Previously, I brought up CMYK and RGB coloring and their differences. CMYK uses subtractive color mixing to add color to printed graphics and images. RGB, on the other hand, uses additive color mixing to overlap colors on digital screens. But this topics dwells on printing in color and there’s one more method that we’re missing: spot colors. Although it’s not as commonly used compared to CMYK, it’s amazing technique should be acknowledged.

What are Spot Colors?

Photo by Copper and Wild on Unsplash

As stated before, CMYK is a color combining method which overlaps each layer of the four base colors (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black) over each other to create the desired colors. With this, an image deceives the eye with four colors. However, spot colors are different because the desired colors are pre-mixed into a solid color. For instance, to get purple, instead of overlapping hues of cyan and magenta, you can use a specific recipe that mixes cyan and magenta to achieve the color wanted. This gives spot colors an advancement in color quality. But just like CMYK printing, it comes with conditions and limitations.

What You Can and Can’t Do

Photo by Keila Hötzel on Unsplash

It’s true that spot colors has conditions, one being money-the main issue that can get very expensive quickly- which is why spot color is used for certain graphics. Unlike for CMYK, where you can print out fully color images, spot colors are mainly used for printing logos. It’s best to print graphics that use four colors or less for smooth, simple coloring. And since spot color matches the perfect hue of your decision, it’s also better for more vibrant or metallic colors. This makes spot color perfect for basic logos consisting of one or two colors. Spot colors are also perfect for small font and fine lines that can’t be easily copied with the halftone dots of CMYK.


Does such high color quality and expensive terms make spot color better than CMYK printing? The answer of course is no. (which I’m sure you knew…right?) Both CMYK and spot color have their strengths and weaknesses but they both amazing ways to put your digital art to print. So if you ever think about using spot color, give it a try! For more information on spot color and its differences from CMYK, check out this amazing website I used. Enjoy!

CMYK & RGB: What’s the Difference?

Here we are again with another round of ‘What’s the Difference?’ in the world of digital design! In this blog we’ll cover the two types of color modes and their comparisons. To many digital designers, these terms are well-known but not as much spoken about. For all we know at the moment, CMYK and RGB deal with colors and how these colors are seen in certain situations. But what about them? Why are they so important in designing graphics? And what are they specialized for? With these questions set in stone, we’ll begin with the research on these two important color modes.


CMYK

Photo by Dario Seretin on Unsplash

For starters, the color mode CMYK is an a abbreviation for Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and BlacK. These are the colors used to print graphics and images. The ink is used via subtractive mixing to turn a blank white page into a page with various particular colors. As stated before, the CMYK color mode is used for graphics and images that will be physically printed, so this color mode is best used with business cards, flyers, t-shirts, restaurant menus, etc. When preparing a digital graphic for printing, most file formats are compatible for CMYK, but some files are most suited for printing than others. The most compatible file formats for CMYK are PDFs, AI (Adobe Illustrator, if you have access to it), and EPS (a good file format for vector programs besides Illustrator).

RGB

Photo by Florian Olivo on Unsplash

Next up is RGB, an abbreviation for the colors Red, Green, and Blue. These three colors are used via additive mixing to turn a black screen into a screen full of colors varying in intensity. Such freedom with the colors can allow the designer to adjust how shaded, vibrant, and saturated the colors are projected. When I say ‘screen’ I’m referring to digital screens such as: computers, smartphones, televisions, etc. The RGB color modes allows graphics to be seen on such screens like icons, online ads, images, videos, and more. Just like CMYK, RGB has file formats that they can work best with. These formats are JPEGs, GIFs, PNGs, and PSD (for Adobe Photoshop).


With this new found information, I believe he have a lot to thank these color modes for (or at least the engineers who created them). These modes are not only responsible for the many physical things we see around, but for the seemingly endless digital graphics we encounter each day. Hopefully this post clears up the confusion for these commonly used terms, and helps you determine when and how to use CMYK and RGB. If you were unsatisfied with the brief explanation, feel free to use the website I used as research for the color modes. Enjoy!