Presentations & Its Terminology

Greetings! In a previous post I covered the full aspect of a multimedia presentation; something more commonly used for demonstrations. Because of this fact, I don’t believe I have to explain what a presentation is. Instead, we’ll go over the terms in describing the structure of a presentation (because that really exists and it important).

Introduction

Photo by Belinda Fewings on Unsplash

An introduction is usually the opening of any form of communication: letters, essays, calls, etc. It’s a short greeting to the audience, as well as a brief description of the speaker(s) and the topic. It’s not an exact requirement to have an introduction for presenting, but it is highly recommended to make a good first impression for the audience.

Speaker

To put it simply, the speaker in the presentation is the person, or people who is expressing their topic to the audience with their presentation. So, in this case, I’m the speaker of this blog and you are the audience.

Audience

Photo by Antenna on Unsplash

With you being the audience of this blog, this means that you are the person that listens to the presentation of the speaker. It is important for the speaker to know who their audience is in order to properly engage and relate to them. This way the amount of influence that comes from the presentation would be nothing but positive! (That being said, who are you?)

Topic

When presenting a topic to an audience, the speaker states the matters of a general idea they want to convey. A topic is a basic concept that’s spoken about with the intent of it being discussed about. An easy example would be this blog having the topic on common presentation terms.

Structure

Photo by Austin Distel on Unsplash

A presentation could be as visually attractive as ever, but it would be in vain if the presentation lacked proper structure. Structure is the proper formatting of a presentation. This can be done with good transitions, connections, and a clear focus on the topic. It’s easily seen as a major component to a presentation, as well as other types of communication. 

Transition

Now when you move on from one statement to something different, you don’t just state them immediately after the other, right? (I hope you said no). Whenever a speaker wants to move onto one place to another, it’s important to use transitions to make the presentation move smoothly. A transition is a phrase or word used to connect two different topics or statement together to prevent awkwardness in presenting.

Connections

Photo by You X Ventures on Unsplash

Connections are additional information or scenarios to expand a topic and compare it to other things in the world. This is where examples, personal stories, and demonstrations come it. It allows the topic to be easier to relate to by the speaker, as well as being easier to understand. Many speakers use this tactic without even realizing it, because that’s how necessary it is.

Graphics

But what’s a presentation without graphic? Graphics are visually pieces of information to further state an idea, fact, or opinion. Graphs, videos, and photos are commonly used for engagement and a surplus in information in a presentation. While they may look pretty, remember its role in a great presentation. 

Sources

Photo by Helloquence on Unsplash

Unless your mind holds all the knowledge in the world, then there’s a little chance of you getting those facts and graphics from your mind. Sources are varieties of information and visuals coming from other people. It’s great to take information from different sources to be more specific with the topic. And it’s even better to give credit to the sources you used after finishing the presentation. It’s just like the way I give credit to the photographers in each photo seen.

Paraphrase

In modern times when our attention span has drastically decreased, there’s no time to state your ideas verbatim from your thoughts or other sources. Presentations are used to speak freely while getting to the main points of your topic. Which is why paraphrasing your words are crucial to a good presentation. Paraphrasing is to shorten an original block of text to its main elements. This saves time, keeps the topic in focus, and doesn’t bore the audience.

Conclusion

Photo by Hayley Catherine on Unsplash

Finally the Conclusion, the final section when the speaker makes a summary of their entire presentation and closes off. Since this is the main thing the audience remembers, it’s important to make the conclusion are well-rounded and understandable as possible. This reduces the chance of it being forgotten. But overall, it’s just a simple farewell and thanks to the audience. So, thank you very much for reading this post, I hope these terms helps you create a well-structured presentation in the future. For great examples, check out this website I used to gather my info. Ciao!

 

Multimedia Presentation

Remember when presentations back then mainly consisted of a speech with flash cards and pictures that were passed around to the audience (if they even had some to show)? Well now in the 21st century we don’t have to be as basic anymore! With technology stronger and smarter than ever, we can make ideas and discussions more engaging and understandable. This is done with Multimedia Presentations, exhibitions that use cool graphics and forms of media to make your topic interesting and helpful. A popular software would be Microsoft PowerPoint, and there’s also Apple Keynote which are great at making multimedia presentations. Some examples of what is usually found in these presentations are:


Videos

Photo by Teemu Paananen on Unsplash

Videos can be found in multimedia presentations to add extra info or recap their topic from other sources. Sometimes hearing a different sound can grab the audience’s attention. And what better way to speak based off outside sources than to show the audience themselves. Whether they’re short clips or hours long, the type of video is determined by whatever the speaker wants to show. To give a few examples, people present music videos, clips of movie scenes, spoken word performances, or recorded experiments. The possibilities are endless. So put your presentation in motion!

Audio

Photo by John-Mark Smith on Unsplash

Something more amusing for the ears would be auditory media. This isn’t commonly used since it’s just auditory and little visuals. But if used the right way, it can be pretty cool. Things like sounds of daily life (nature, gatherings, etc) or certain music could be used. It could even be simple background music to cancel out the overbearing silence. To give an idea, let’s say a speaker presents an audio clip of birds singing and tweeting in the morning. Now imagine life without such sounds due to climate change. Really makes one wonder…

Animations

Photo by Denise Jans on Unsplash

And lastly there’s animations, a relatively newbie in multimedia presentations. A basic idea on animations could be the cool slide transitions that you see in Microsoft PowerPoint. That’s a form of animation that can be found in most presentations, but what about actual graphics and animations. This could be a GIF, a 2D or 3D animation, or a stop-motion. Although at first glance they seem weird to add to a presentation, it’s a very creative way to share info and entertain the audience.


After reading this, you may realize how common multimedia presentations are without even noticing it. It’s become the social norm, with little knowledge of what it is. To be a very complex form of presentation made simple enough for a primary school student to use, that’s pretty impressive. There’s much more to a multimedia presentation as the creative world expands each day (even each hours!), but these features are the foundations of a multimedia presentation. I hope you take the time to make a few of your own!

Show out to Presentation Magazine for their super simple explanation on Multimedia Presentations! Check them out here!