What Makes a Good Landing Page?

In an earlier blog, I covered good strategies for designing a website. Considering things like your target audience, color psychology, and functionality, are good examples of such strategies for your website overall. But what about a website’s first impression? In this case, the first thing an audience would see can either be the website’s homepage, or its landing page. Since every website has a homepage, we’re focusing on something less common to land on. While a landing page might seem unnecessary for your web page, it’s at least good to know the do’s and don’ts of a landing page if it’s ever needed.

Designing the Perfect Landing Page

Photo by Le Buzz on Unsplash

For starters, a good landing page must be straight to the point on its purpose with very little else to distract the audience. Keeping things simple and welcoming is essential for attracting any audience that lands on the page. It’s also important for the landing page to answer any question that would come to mind when reaching the main focus of the landing page. These would include features, any costs, and comparison to any of your competition. Make your landing page flow and engage the audience enough to follow through whatever you want them to do. And finally, you want to make sure that your ‘Call to Action’ is straightforward; if you redirect your users too often, they’ll leave in frustration. And if you want to avoid frustrating your users, let’s move on to mistake that should be avoided when making a landing page.

The Don’ts of a Landing Page

Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

Surprisingly, a major blunder with landing pages is that its loading time is too slow. With this being the first thing they see after clicking on the website, landing pages that take more than 5 seconds to appear gets rejected before their even given a chance. This is a problem that revolves around coding the landing page so that it can exceed the insanely low patience and high expectations of the web user. Another mistake to avoid is having a weak headline. A decent balance between direct and creative is ideal, but it’s safer to play direct if you can’t brainstorm attractive headlines. As long as you replace these possible slip-ups with the suggestions above, you’re go to go!


I hope this information helped gather a well enough idea for a landing page, or the consideration of making one. Of course, even without these tips there’s nothing wrong with looking up landing pages for reference. For more information on making good and bad landing pages, check out these websites for each, respectively. And as always, enjoy!