Typography in Web Design

In my earlier post, I showed how web designers use the Joshua Tree Epiphany to tie their website together in a way that’s visually pleasing. No matter how innovative an idea may be, without the proper structure it can look disorganized and unattractive. And this concept also applies to typography, the art of arranging words to evoke emotion and give a message. As a reader, we don’t automatically acknowledge the process of finding the best typefaces and fonts for the website we click on. But typography is an essential technique for designing web designs. So, in this blog, we’ll cover the usage of typefaces: both good and bad.

How are Fonts Used

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Before we look at examples of typography in websites, it’s best to understand how fonts are used to convey messages and emotions. Although it may not be comprehended at first glance, the style of a font must be taken into consideration when presenting text to an audience. When publishing magazines or newspapers, the body text is most likely going to be a serif typeface because the ‘serifs’ or extra strokes at the ends of the letter helps with readability. On the other hand, most websites use sans-serif typefaces because it works well with any monitor no matter the screen resolution. And if you want regal invitations, decorative or calligraphy typefaces are the best choice. Furthermore, the font style, size, weight, and more must also be considered. Certain fonts can give your work a sophisticated, modern, or abstract feel. There are fonts that are partially art and fonts that contribute to word play. The possibilities of typefaces and fonts are endless, and with this knowledge let’s see how to use typography well and not so well.

Critiqued Typography Techniques

Up first is a website called Mr. Bottles, an antique bottle collecting resource. The first that’s noticed is the main title and header of the website. And if the font is almost unreadable (as presented), then it will confuse the user. I, in fact, didn’t know what it said until I looked at its URL. It’s good to have a font that matches the theme of the website, but it becomes a waste if it can’t be comprehended. Another critique would be the usage of the same font in the menu. It’s always best to make the font used the menu different than the watermark; something more legible and easier to spot. It ensures that the wordmark logo doesn’t compete with everything else on the website for the user’s attention

Besides the technical aspect of typography, a font has the match the theme of the website. And Penny Juice gives a good example of this in its wordmark. For a website based on children, it does give the child-friendly feel like other child-centered websites. Even though a child wouldn’t click on this website, parents and people who work with kids respond well to websites that look child-friendly. Using vivid or pastel colors with typefaces that are more rounded and cuter can go a long way.

Applauded Typography Techniques

To end on a good note, let’s look at websites that uses typography well. And to start off, we have The Next Rembrandt, a promotion website for said film. In contrast to Mr. Bottles, this website makes the wordmark the center of attention. And simultaneously making sure the menu and header are equally important and therefore legible. The wordmark’s choice of font gives off a mysterious feel that matches the theme of the website and even the film. It definitely shows that a wordmark can be abstract and comprehensible!

Next is this simple and symmetrical website. It really shows that a less can be more. Though the text isn’t anything special like the past websites shown, Mixd, a website designing company, uses typography is other ways. For a website that boasts about “beautiful form” and “perfect function”, it does show it in their word tracking and leading. The way they space out the pieces of text along with the letters themselves reflects the perfection they’re trying to promote.

Using the Joshua Tree Epiphany in Websites

The Joshua Tree Epiphany can easily be seen as the blueprint of basic design. It consists of Contrast, Repetition, Alignment, and Proximity. You can’t have the most unique and flashiest idea, but without these principles, there will always be something…off. It’s always refreshing to see simple designs that flow so well together because of the usage of the Joshua Tree Epiphany. So, in this blog will be highlighting the usage of the Epiphany in web design. And our example will be Lemonade, a Home and Rental Insurance company.

Contrast

To put it simply, if elements aren’t the same, make them stand out. Contrasting items in your design draws attention, which is essential for anything that you want your audience to pay attention. Lemonade uses this principle very well in the way they sparsely use pink in their mainly grey and white landing page. This color pop keeps the audience hooked and makes it easy to find certain links or CTAs.

Repetition

Now if you’re going to make designs specified to grab one’s attention, make sure to repeat them. Consistent elements in a design keeps everything unified and recognizable to any user, no matter how many times they’ve visited the website. In this website’s case, the pink color was used throughout their FAQ. And it wasn’t used randomly, but for hyperlinks to other pages in their website. Which is an ingenious idea, even if it’s a simple.

Alignment

Next is something simple, but equally important. Placing things on the website randomly only brings confusion. Giving the elements in the website some sort of a visual tie keeps things clear and readable. Lemonade shows a good example in their blog page. Center aligning the title and graphics, left-aligning the text, and keeping social media links to the right.

Proximity

And lastly, there’s proximity which is grouping related items together to make visual units. It removes clutter and gives clear structure to your design. Organized designs are more likely to be read and remembered. You can see this in the way the introduction for ‘Making a Change” is close to the title and spaced out from the next piece of text. Using space instead for clear transition instead of graphic designs is much more efficient in easy readability.

As you can see, the Joshua Tree Epiphany is essential for a well-rounded website. Hopefully this quick explanation is enough to quickly use it to practice. Unfortunately, all this information comes straight from my personal notes, but feel free to look for websites like Lemonade that use these principles for a good reference. Enjoy!

What Makes a Good Landing Page?

In an earlier blog, I covered good strategies for designing a website. Considering things like your target audience, color psychology, and functionality, are good examples of such strategies for your website overall. But what about a website’s first impression? In this case, the first thing an audience would see can either be the website’s homepage, or its landing page. Since every website has a homepage, we’re focusing on something less common to land on. While a landing page might seem unnecessary for your web page, it’s at least good to know the do’s and don’ts of a landing page if it’s ever needed.

Designing the Perfect Landing Page

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For starters, a good landing page must be straight to the point on its purpose with very little else to distract the audience. Keeping things simple and welcoming is essential for attracting any audience that lands on the page. It’s also important for the landing page to answer any question that would come to mind when reaching the main focus of the landing page. These would include features, any costs, and comparison to any of your competition. Make your landing page flow and engage the audience enough to follow through whatever you want them to do. And finally, you want to make sure that your ‘Call to Action’ is straightforward; if you redirect your users too often, they’ll leave in frustration. And if you want to avoid frustrating your users, let’s move on to mistake that should be avoided when making a landing page.

The Don’ts of a Landing Page

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Surprisingly, a major blunder with landing pages is that its loading time is too slow. With this being the first thing they see after clicking on the website, landing pages that take more than 5 seconds to appear gets rejected before their even given a chance. This is a problem that revolves around coding the landing page so that it can exceed the insanely low patience and high expectations of the web user. Another mistake to avoid is having a weak headline. A decent balance between direct and creative is ideal, but it’s safer to play direct if you can’t brainstorm attractive headlines. As long as you replace these possible slip-ups with the suggestions above, you’re go to go!


I hope this information helped gather a well enough idea for a landing page, or the consideration of making one. Of course, even without these tips there’s nothing wrong with looking up landing pages for reference. For more information on making good and bad landing pages, check out these websites for each, respectively. And as always, enjoy!

The Rave on Bootstrap CSS

Technology has really expanded its inclusiveness due to the abundant access that the general population can retrieve. This is because now not only do we have everything, but we can learn how to do everything. Remember when people who knew how to make print designs or design websites were seen as super geniuses (or just nerds)? Now with a few lessons and programs with free-to-use graphics, anyone could be a graphic designer! This is where websites like Canva and Bootstrap CSS step in. For now, we’re going to target Bootstrap CSS to figure out why this powerful website is so highly praised.

What is Bootstrap CSS?

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Bootstrap CSS was released in August 2011 as a free-to-use mobile-first framework for developing websites, including templates and JavaScript plugins. Some of the HTML and CSS design template they provide are for typography, navigation, tables, and much more. It’s quick and easy development process allows developers to create responsive web designs. In other words, your website will be able to automatically adjust themselves to work on all devices. As mentioned before, you don’t have to be a whiz at programming to build a website because anyone with basic knowledge of HTML and CSS and use Bootstrap. And because Bootstrap is compatible with all modern browsers like Chrome, Firefox, Safari and Edge, it can be used by virtually anyone with a PC. It’s no wonder that there’s so much hype about such an product.

Bootstraps Popularity

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Bootstrap quickly gained popularity as a reliable front-end framework for building websites and web applications. Such a reputation can be shown in the fact that it have a market share with more than 16% of all websites. In January 2020, there were over 1.74 billion websites on the internet. This makes Bootstrap accountable for over 278 million websites (if I did my math correctly). With this much websites found globally, what makes this design framework so infamous? It’s simply because of how effective and easy it is to use. Frameworks such as Bootstrap can add consistency to your projects without having to constantly recode since it comes with pre-built options. This is what allows developers to build beautiful, user-friendly web designs. So it goes without saying, if you wish to create great responsive websites, use Bootstrap


It’s honestly thrilling when you think about how far technology has come from here. Hopefully this information (and recommendation) helps you out with any future web designing projects. For more information check out these websites about Bootstrap CSS and its features here. Enjoy!

Design Strategies for Websites

In my last post, I covered the methods for finding the perfect target audience for your website. But now that you’ve found them, you must move on to step two. This is reeling in the audience to attract regular visitors and promote whatever your website is about. Of course, when one thinks of strategies for designing attractive websites, it’s mainly about the aesthetics. And while it’s very true, it’s also important to make sure the website is consistent and user-friendly. There’s many other strategies for designing a website, but for now we’ll just cover the basic tactics of web design.

Designing Eye Candy

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Making your website visually pleasing for your audience initially stems from any ‘needs’ they may have. From the same example before, if the website’s target audience is elderly people, you should consider larger and easy-to-read fonts. Once all the ‘needs’ are figured out, you can move on the the ‘wants’. And what you should want is a balance of color and typography that accurately represents the topic of your website. Choose color palettes that aren’t too contrasted, but hues from the same color family to bring harmony. Use the principles of typography to pick a few fonts that match the feelings you want to convey (e.g. For sophistication you’d use script, cursive fonts).Finally, when adding info graphics or photos, use the rule of thirds to properly balance the placement of graphics throughout your website.

Use Familiar Conventions

A great part of designing everything is that you have the liberty to do whatever you want. This truth isn’t limited to the layout of a website, but it should be. It’s well and justified to want to design a website that’s unique and full of innovative graphics. However, it’s more ideal to create a website with conventions that the general audience can recognize. This would include placing the web logo at the top above the navigation menu. Or having the contact info at the bottom of the site shown with identifiable icons. This is allows visitors to browse a new website and automatically understand where to go. And that’s much better than them leaving the website in a flash because everything was too “abstract” to navigate through. Sometimes, comfort-zones are the way to go.


Putting aside the hard, dedicated work it takes to develop a website, it takes a lot of brainstorming for designing a website. And that’s because you have to make creativity compromises for yourself and your audience. Something that looks amazing to you, may not be so appealing to your target audience. So, I hope these strategies help give you a create a standard plan for designing your website. There’s much more designing tips out there which can be found in this website about effective website design. Enjoy!